Presence in the celebration of University of Innsbruck 350th anniversary

Benedikt Pressl and Mia Kvåle Løvmo, members of the sub-project Imaging of Trapped Particles presented part of their work related to the SFB at the events “Campus Tage Technik” in April and “Fest der Wissenschaft” in June, as part of the 350th anniversary of the University of Innsbruck.

Scientists working at the Campus Technik presented aspects of their research (small presentations and experiments) to more than 1500 pupils. Benedikt was the coordinator and together with Mia, Franziska Strasser, Simon Moser, Alexander Jesacher, Lisa Bodner, Nicola Bregenzer and Martin Bawart gave hands-on experiments and exciting presentations about Optical tweezers and Lasers.

SFB goes to Banff, Canada

Otmar Scherzer was a member of the organizing committee of the “Reconstruction Methods for Inverse Problems” workshop in Banff, Canada, June 23-28, 2019. This workshop brought together researchers working on inverse problems coming from medical imaging, non destructive testing, computer vision and geophysics. The PI of sub-project “Quantitative Coupled Physics Imaging”, Peter Elbau and the post-doctoral researcher of the sub-project “Tomography with Uncertainties”, Ekaterina Sherina presented their recent work related to our SFB project.

Photo credit: The Banff International Research Station

Reconstruction Methods for Inverse Problems (19w5092)

at Banff, Alberta from Sunday, June 23 to Friday June 28, 2019

Organizers

  • Elena Beretta (NYU Abu Dhabi & Politecnico di Milano)
  • Uri Ascher (University of British Columbia)
  • Otmar Scherzer (University of Vienna)
  • Luminita Vese (University of California, Los Angeles)

Description

Inverse problems require to determine the cause from a set of indirect observations. Such problems appear in medical imaging, non destructive testing of materials, computerized tomography, source reconstructions in acoustics, computer vision and geophysics, to mention but a few. The 21st century is the golden age of computer imaging: Measurement devices have become enormously powerful and huge amounts of data are recorded at every eye glimpse. Moreover, computer technology has developed to such a high degree of efficiency that the evaluation of such an enormous amount of data has become possible *if* adequate mathematical and computational tools are used.

Recently, the community has been exposed to fundamentally new mathematical models (such as learning), which stimulated exciting theoretical developments and new computational algorithms for solving complicated large scale inverse problems. This workshop will survey modern and identify new mathematical and computational developments for tackling such problems.

more details

The SFB team is growing!

The  SFB “Tomography across the scales” continues to grow. We are pleased to announce that

  • Lisa Krainz joined our team as a PhD student in the Subproject: Multi-Modal Imaging of W. Drexler. She will be working at the Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering.
  • Leopold Veselka is the PhD student at the Computational Science Center under the supervision of P. Elbau, working in the Subproject: Quantitative Coupled Physics Imaging.
  • Simon Hubmer is the postdoctoral researcher in the Subproject: Tomography in Astronomy of R. Ramlau
  • Mia Kvåle Løvmo joins the team of M. Ritsch-Marte, as a PhD student, working in Subproject: Imaging of Trapped Particles at the Division for Biomedical Physics.
  • Denise Schmutz started her PhD studies at the Computational Science Center, working in O. Scherzer’s  Subproject: Tomography with Uncertainties.
  • Montse López (PostDoc) and Magdalena Schneider (PhD student) joined G. Schütz’s group, participating in Subproject: Ultra-high Resolution Microscopy, located at the Institute of Applied Physics – Biophysics.

 

There are still open positions! You can apply here.